(Re-)Imagining the Shirts

Becky found a couple of really good quality pieces – an Edina Ronay sleeveless top, and a Rodier Paris blue ruffle shirt. Both have damage on the front: the Ronay shirt has tea/coffee stains centre front on the upper cream part; and the blue blouse has a cut on the ruffle that has been stitched up in rather a messy manner.

Edina Ronay sleeveless shirt from Mary's Living and Giving (Save the Children), £30. Quite a lot to pay for a polyester piece with a stain, but the fabric quality and detail in the structure makes it a nice piece… Worth saving.

Edina Ronay sleeveless shirt from Mary’s Living and Giving (Save the Children), £30. Quite a lot to pay for a polyester piece with a stain, but the fabric quality and detail in the structure makes it a nice piece… Worth saving.

Becky’s ideas for the Ronay Shirt are to over print using torn strips of dyed paper, to cover the stains and make navy the predominant color of the piece. The plan is to create a top to wear with a pair of trousers and a skirt in her existing wardrobe that are under-used.

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The plan for the Rodier Shirt is to use plain black paper and an iron to over print, but to open up the damaged area and make a feature of it, using the Sculptural Overlays Trend Bag as inspiration…

 

Rodier Paris ruffle shirt

Rodier Paris ruffle shirt

Badly repaired damage on the ruffle...

Badly repaired damage on the ruffle…

 

Ilke and Trish: Choosing our shirts, consider our personal style, the SS15 trends, the tools we have hacked and the potential we can see if we add or change certain elements…

Choosing a shirt

Choosing a shirt

Ilke's shirt. Thinking trend

Ilke’s shirt. Thinking trend

Examining the trend bags.

Examining the trend bags.

Tracing our shirts gives us a life size template to design onto, placing our patterns and using our tools on the template allows us to visuals how it would look after the printing process tomorrow.

Prepare to draw

Prepare to draw

The tools which we hacked are very unpredictable, but this allows us to work creatively with new marks and pattern making. Working large scale offers a freedom which we cannot normally experience working on small scale drawings or on computer design programmes.

Tool 3. Mark making. Scale

Tool 3. Mark making. Scale

A nice beginning for redesigning our shirts and a good start for the transforming process of printing tomorrow.

Print for collar.

Print for collar.

Collaging 'designing' the shirt

Collaging ‘designing’ the shirt

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